This bird has flown.

I'm Leanne, a twenty-one year old artist/designer from Canada. This blog is about things that inspire and amuse me, while also occasionally showing some of my own work.

pricebullington:

Benjamin Cohen

(via reclosure)

(via drlaynerz)

irisnectar:

From the exhibit Drinking on the Job by Neck Face

(via sweetstarlighht)

who-:

Explosive Paintings Reach Beyond the Traditional Frame

In these artworks by artist Valerie Hegarty, it looks like the walls have exploded with an array of fruits, foliage, and decay. At first glance, one might think they are viewing art that has been destroyed. However, Hegarty is well-known for her explosive work that reaches out, beyond a flat area and into three-dimensional space.

(via futurebruises)

beben-eleben:

Jim Dingilian proves that a creative and skillful artist can create works of art with just about anything. By coating the interior of empty glass bottles with black smoke and then carefully brushing it away with tools mounted on dowels, he creates detailed and beautiful but dark works of smoke art that are dripping with a sense of suburban decay (via Bored Panda).

(via sineofmadness)

End of summer, cabin is packed up in preparation for fall/winter :( #photooftheday #ripsummer

Completed commission!

betype:

Scripts: Elegant Lettering from Design’s Golden Age

No one person ever invented an alphabet,” wrote Type-maven Tommy Thompson. Script typefaces were no exception. During the letterpress era they were in such great demand that many people “invented” them, and many others copied them. In some commercial printing shops, composing cases filled with scripts were stacked floor to ceiling to the exclusion of other type. Printers routinely amassed multiple styles of the heavy metal type fonts, each possessing a distinct twist, flourish or quirk, used to inject the hint of personality or dash of character to quotidian printed pieces. Fonts had names like Wedding Plate Script, Cursive Script, Engravers Script, Bank Script, Master Script, French Script, Stationers Semiscript and Myrtle Script — Myrtle? — there were countless others. They surfaced in Europe and America. And the exact same types in France, for example, could be found in Italian foundries with different names.

Scripts signaled propriety, suggested authority yet also exuded status and a bourgeois aesthetic. The wealthy classes couldn’t get enough fashionable scripts in their diet. Likewise, the nouveau riche embraced them too — maybe it helped them to appear even more wealthy. 

Seen in everything from wedding invitations and birth announcements to IOUs, menus, and diplomas, script typefaces impart elegance and sophistication to a broad variety of texts. Scripts never go out of style, and the hundreds of inventive examples here are sure to inspire today’s designers. Derived from handwriting, these are typefaces that are stylized to suggest, imply, or symbolize certain traits linked to writing. Their fundamental characteristic is that all the letters, more or less, touch those before and after. Drawn from the Golden Age of scripts, from the nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century, this is the first compilation of popular, rare, and forgotten scripts from the United States, Germany, France, England, and Italy. Featuring examples from a vast spectrum of sources—advertisements, street signs, type-specimen books, and personal letters—this book is a delightful and invaluable trove of longoverlooked material. 275 illustrations, 254 in color

USA: http://amzn.to/18ou7s9
UK: http://amzn.to/18F7HOd

jinyeong:

mint chocolate chip macarons - 

(via laterlol)